IELTS stands for The International English Language Test. This test is designed to make it easier for students who wish to migrate, study or work in countries where English is the native language. Some of these countries include the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. In taking up IELTS, students can gauge their ability to read, write, listen, and speak in English. As such the students are graded on a scale of 1-9 in this test. IELTS is managed by Cambridge Assessment English, IELTS Australia, and the British Council.

English is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world with more than 379 million people having the ability to speak it. It is beneficial for students to be able to communicate in English when they wish to study or work in a country where it is the native language. Having a good command of English will be an added advantage for students when they search for job opportunities overseas. With ILETS being one of the prominent standardised tests for demonstrating one’s capabilities in English, taking it up and excelling in it makes a lot of difference.

Globally, IELTS is recognized and accepted by more than 10,000 schools, universities, immigration bodies, and employers. In the US alone, more than 3,400 institutes recognize IELTS.

Exam Structure

IELTS test can be of two types – General Training and Academic. Also, the Speaking and Listening tests for all the candidates will be the same. However, the Writing and Reading tests for them will be different. Therefore, you need to select the right test type.

The Writing, Reading, and Listening sections of IELTS are all completed on the same day with no breaks in between them. However, the Speaking section can be completed by candidates either before a week or after the tests. Typically, the IELTS test time is 2 hours and 45 minutes.

To check your progress and know which position you are in, you can consider taking a practice test conducted by IELTS itself. This online test will indicate your probable score and areas you can work on to improve your score in the actual test. You can click this link for checking your progress: https://www.ielts.org/for-test-takers/how-to-prepare/ielts-progress-check.

Listening – 30 minutes

Candidates will be listening to 4 recordings of native English speakers in this section. Thereafter, a series of questions will be posed to candidates and the answers for them need to be written.

  • Recording 1 – This will include a conversation between 2 people set in a social context.

  • Recording 2 – This includes a monologue set in a social context. E.g. A speech describing local facilities.

  • Recording 3 – This includes a conversation between few people set in a training or educational context. E.g. A student and a university lecturer discussing a chapter.

  • Recording 4 – This includes a monologue relating to an academic subject. E.g. a university lecture.

Evaluators consider a few factors before deciding on a score for your effort. This includes your ability to gauge detailed factual information and the main ideas. The evaluators also consider the attitudes of speakers and their opinions and the capability of candidates in following the development of ideas.

Paper format – There will be 10 questions in each of the four parts. The design of questions will be such that they appear in the same order as they are heard in the audio.

The situations related to the everyday social context will be included in the first two parts. Part 1 includes a conversation between 2 speakers. This conversation could be anything, like travel arrangements, etc. Part 2 will be a monologue, like a speech highlighting local facilities. The remaining parts will deal with subjects related to training and educational ones.

Candidates will hear the recordings only once. The accents of speakers will include Australian, American, British, Canadian, and New Zealand.

Timing – 30 minutes (An additional 10 minutes transfer time)

No. of questions – 40

Types of tasks – Different types of questions are posed, like – multiple choices, table/note/form/summary completion/flow-chart, matching, sentence completion, and diagram/map/plan labelling.

Answering – Candidates need to use the question paper itself for writing their answers as they are listening. At the end of the test, 10 minutes will be given to them for transferring answers to a separate answer sheet. Candidates need to be careful while writing answers on the answer sheet as they can be penalized for poor grammar and spelling mistakes.

Marks – The candidate is awarded 1 mark for each question.

Task type 1 – Multiple choices

Type of task and its format – Multiple choice tasks will typically include a question followed by a set of possible answers. Another probability is the beginning of a sentence followed by different options to end the sentence. Candidates are required to choose between the options – A, B or C.

Occasionally, candidates are presented with a long list of possible answers and are required to choose more than one answer. In such cases, candidates should read the question carefully and understand how many answers are expected from them.

The focus of task – A wide range of skills of candidates is tested through multiple choice questions in IELTS. Candidates are expected to have an overall understanding of important points or have a detailed understanding of specific points of the listening text.

Number of questions – Variable

Task type 2 – Matching

Type of task and its format – Candidates are required to match a list of items with different options presented to them on the question paper. Criteria of some kind could be included in the set of options.

The focus of task – The task focuses on the ability of the candidate to listen to the details of a conversation that is based on an everyday topic and understand it. The conversation could be anything, like different types of guest house accommodation or hotel. The task is also beneficial for assessing the capability of the candidate in following a conversation between two people.

Number of questions – Variable

Task type 3 – Diagram, map, plan labelling

Type of task and its format – Candidates are required to complete labels on a diagram (like an equipment piece), map (like a part of town) or a plan (like a building). A list is provided to candidates on the question paper and they are required to select one answer out of it.

The focus of task –This task is useful in assessing a candidate’s ability to understand. For example, describing a place and relate to it visually.

Number of questions – Variable

Task type 4 – Table, note, form, summary completion, flow-chart

Type of task and its format – To complete this task, candidates need to fill in the gaps presented to them in the outline or the listening text. The text will emphasize important facts/ideas. It may be:

  • A table: is used for summarizing information that helps in clearing different categories, like price/time/place, etc.

  • A set of notes: is used for summarizing information by developing a layout indicating the relationship between different items.

  • A form: is used for recording factual details, like names

  • A flow-chart: is used for summarizing processes that have clear stages. The direction of processes is indicated by arrows.

Candidates are required to select answers from a list given to them on the question paper or find out the missing words from the recording. However, the candidates need to keep an eye on the set word limit. There is no need for changing the words given in the recording in any way.

Instructions must be read carefully by candidates as they often indicate the limit on numbers and words the candidates need to use while filling the gaps. When more words are written by candidates, they are appropriately penalized for the same and this is the case with all the tasks. Also, candidates need to understand that hyphenated words are considered as single words and the contracted words are not tested.

The focus of task – The focus is on the ability of the candidate to record main points in a situation given to him or her.

Number of questions – Variable

Task type 5 – Sentence completion

Type of task and its format –In this task, candidates are required to read out sentences that contain the summary of text they are listening to or a part of it. After reading out, the candidates are required to fill the gap with information in each sentence. For this task, candidates are given a word limit.

Candidates are penalized for including more words than they are supposed to. Therefore, candidates should check the limit for word usage. Hyphenated words are treated as single words. Contracted words are not tested.

The focus of task – The focus here is to find out the key information that is hidden in the listening text. Functional relationships need to be understood by candidates, like the cause and effect.

Number of questions – Variable

Task type 6 – Short-answer questions

Type of task and its format –In this task, candidates are required to read a question and then write the answer for it based on the details provided in the listening text. Candidates need to follow the set word limit. Candidates are penalized for writing more than the prescribed limit. Hyphenated words are treated as single words. Contracted words are not tested. Occasionally, candidates are required to list out 2 or 3 points based on a question given to them.

The focus of task –This task focuses on gauging the candidate’s ability to listen to facts, like times, prices or places, within the listening text.

Number of questions – Variable

Marking for the Listening test is done by certified markers. The markers are monitored regularly to ensure reliability. Furthermore, after being marked, all the answer sheets are further analyzed by Cambridge Assessment English.

Reading – 60 minutes

This section comprises 40 questions and is designed to test the candidate’s reading skills. The testing will be done for assessing different types of reading skills, reading for detail, reading for main ideas, reading for gist, purpose, attitude, recognizing opinions of writers, understanding logical argument, and skimming.

The reading test includes 3 long texts that range from factual and descriptive to analytical and discursive. Typically, the texts are taken from different sources, like newspapers, books, magazines, and journals. Though the texts are suitable for a non-specialist audience, it is apt even for candidates seeking admission to universities.

Paper format – There will be 3 reading passages that will be followed by a variety of questions containing different types of tasks.

Timing – 60 minutes

No. of Questions – 40

Types of tasks – Different varieties of questions are included, like multiple-choice, short-answer questions, note completion, matching headings, flow-chart completion, identifying the writer’s claims/views, matching features, diagram label completion, matching information, table completion, and summary completion, sentence completion, identifying information and matching sentence endings.

Sources – Texts that are normally written for a non-specialist audience are taken from different sources, like books, newspapers, magazines, and journals. Texts generally include issues that are interesting, accessible, and recognizably appropriate for candidates seeking professional registration or undergraduate or postgraduate courses. Also, texts could be written in different styles, like argumentative/discursive, descriptive or narrative. Candidates need to understand that a detailed logical argument may be included in at least one text. Texts could also include in them certain non-verbal items, like illustrations, graphs or diagrams.

Answering – Answers need to be transferred to an answer sheet by candidates within the time allocated for the test. Extra time for transfer is not allowed as per rules. Candidates need to be careful while transferring answers as they can be penalized for poor grammar and spelling mistakes.

Marks – 1 mark is awarded for each question.

Task type 1 – Multiple choices

Types of tasks and format – Four alternatives (A, B, C or D) are provided to candidates out of whom the best answer needs to be chosen. Candidates may also be provided with other options, like choosing the two best answers from the 5 alternatives provided (A, B, C, D or E) or choosing the best 3 answers from the 7 alternatives provided (A, B, C, D, E, F or G). Candidates are required to write the letter of the answer on the answer sheet. The questions could be of different forms, like completing a sentence from different options given to candidates, when the first part of it is given or completing questions with the candidates required choosing the best answers from the options given to them.

The questions asked to candidates will be in the same order as the information provided in the text. This means the answer to the first question will be located in the text before the answer to the second question.

The focus of tasks – This task will gauge the candidate’s wide range of reading skills, like understanding the main points of the text or understanding specific points in the text.

No. of questions – Variable

Task type 2 – Identifying information

Types of tasks and format –Several statements are provided to candidates and asked if the following statements match with the information provided in the text or not. Candidates are then required to write ‘not given’, ‘true’ or ‘false’ in their answer sheets.

Candidates need to understand the difference between ‘not given’ and ‘false’. ‘Not given’ means the statement is neither contradicted nor confirmed by the information provided in the text while ‘false’ means the statement made by the passage is opposite to the statement in the question.

It is beneficial for students to understand that their outside knowledge should not play a part in deciding on their answers.

The focus of tasks – Helps gauge the candidate’s ability to identify important information or points in the text.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 3 –Identifying writer’s claims/views

Types of tasks and format –Candidates are given a series of statements and are asked whether those statements are in line with the claims/views of the writer. Candidates need to write ‘yes’ or ‘no’ in the boxes provided in their answer sheet.

It is beneficial for students to understand that their outside knowledge should not play a part in deciding on their answers.

The focus of tasks – This task is useful in gauging the candidate’s ability to identify ideas or opinions. Therefore, they are often used alongside argumentative or discursive texts.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 4 –Matching information

Types of tasks and format –Candidates are required to identify specific information in the lettered sections/paragraphs of the text and write down the letters of the correct sections/paragraphs in their answer sheet.

In this task, the candidate may be asked to find – a reason, an example, specific details, a description, an explanation or a summary. Candidates may not be asked to find specific details in every section/paragraph of the text. However, they may need to identify specific details from a given section/paragraph. In these cases, they will be suggested to use any letter multiple times, if required.

Any type of text can be used for this task as it helps gauge the candidate’s ability to read and locate specific details from a section of the text.

The focus of tasks –This task helps assess the ability of the candidate to scan details or information. Unlike the Matching heading task, the assessment made here is only for specific details instead of the main idea.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 5 –Matching headings

Types of tasks and format –In this task, a list of headings is provided to candidates that can be identified using Roman numerals with lower-case (like, i, ii, iii, etc). Each heading refers to the sections or paragraphs main idea. Candidates need to match the heading with appropriate sections or paragraphs that are marked using the alphabets. Candidates are required to write down correct numerals in the boxes provided in their answer sheets. Also, in this task, there will always be more headings than sections or paragraphs, therefore some of the headings may not be used. There are also chances that certain sections or paragraphs may not be included in the task.

The focus of tasks –The objective of the task is to gauge the candidate’s ability to identify the main theme or idea of certain sections or paragraphs of the texts. Also, this task is beneficial in distinguishing important ideas from the less important ones.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 6 –Matching features

Types of tasks and format –Candidates are required to match pieces of information or a set of statements to a list of options. The given options that can be identified by letters are a group containing different features from the text. In this task, candidates are required to matching findings from research to a list of researchers, events to historical periods, characteristics to age groups, etc. There are chances that some options may not be used at all, and others may be used more than once. In this regard, clear instructions will be provided to candidates beforehand.

The focus of tasks –The objective of this task is to assess the candidate’s ability to recognize connections and relationships between facts and understand different theories and opinions hidden in the text. The tasks may be used with both opinion-based discursive texts as well as factual information. Candidates are, therefore, required to search through the text for collecting necessary information and read it in detail.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 7 – Matching sentence endings

Types of tasks and format –Candidates are presented with a half portion of a sentence and asked to complete it by selecting the other portion from the given options. Every option given to the candidate will have a letter associated with it and the correct one needs to be written on the answer sheet.

The focus of tasks –This task focuses on the ability of the candidate to find out the main ideas hidden in a sentence.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 8 – Sentence completion

Types of tasks and format –In this task, candidates are required to complete sentences given to them from the text in a given number of words. The answers must be written in the answer sheet. Candidates will be provided instructions on how many numbers/words they can use in their answers. Candidates stand to lose marks when they write more words than they are asked to.

The focus of tasks –This task focuses on the ability of the candidate to locate specific or detailed information.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 9 – Table, note, summary, flow-chart completion

Types of tasks and format –In this test, candidates are required to complete a summary of the text using the information drawn from it. The summary provided will only be a part of the text and the whole portion of it. Furthermore, the information provided to candidates can be in different forms: a table with some of its cells partially empty or empty, several notes, and steps linked by arrows for indicating the sequence of events, a series of boxes or several connected sentences of the text.

Answers don’t need to come in the same order as in the text. Nonetheless, they usually come from a particular section instead of the entire text.

This task type can have two variants – either select from the list of answers or select words from the text. Where words need to be selected from the text, clear instructions will be provided to candidates on how many numbers/words they should use while writing their answers. Extra numbers/words written on the answer sheet will be penalized.

Candidates can use either words or figures for writing numbers. Also, hyphenated words are considered single words. Contracted words aren’t tested.

This task normally uses precise factual information, so descriptive texts are often used with it.

The focus of tasks –The focus of this task is to assess the ability of the candidate in understanding the main ideas or details of a portion of the text.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 10 –Completion of Diagram label

Types of tasks and format –Here, candidates are required to complete labels on a diagram. Typically, these labels are related to descriptions given in the text. Candidates will also be provided with instructions that will make them clear about how many numbers/words they can use while writing their answers. If more numbers/words are used in answers, candidates stand to lose the mark. Candidates have the freedom to use either words or figures for writing numbers. Also, hyphenated words are considered as single words and the contracted words will not be tested. Candidates need to understand that answers do not appear in the same order as in the passage. However, they are chosen from one section instead of the entire text.

Any element that can be pictorially represented, like parts of a building, type of machine, etc may be included in the diagram. Usually, this task is included with descriptive texts.

The focus of tasks –This task is included to gauge the candidate’s ability to understand a detailed description and connect it with the information that is presented in the form of a diagram.

No. of questions –Variable

Task type 11 –Short-answer questions

Types of tasks and format –In this task, questions related to factual information of the text are asked for candidates. Candidates are required to write answers in numbers or words on their answer sheet. Separate instructions will be given to candidates on how many numbers/words can be used in their answers. In the case where they write more numbers or words in their answers, they stand to lose a mark.

Candidates have the freedom to use either words or figures for writing numbers. Also, hyphenated words are considered as single words and the contracted words will not be tested.

The focus of tasks –This task helps in gauging the candidate’s ability to locate precise information in the text and understand it.

No. of questions –Variable

Marking for the academic reading test is done by certified markers. The markers are monitored regularly to ensure reliability. Furthermore, after being marked, all the answer sheets are further analyzed by Cambridge Assessment English.

Academic Writing – 60 minutes

Topics in this section are suitable and are of general interest to candidates seeking professional registration or entering undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The academic writing section involves two tasks:

Task 1: Candidates will be presented with a chart, table, diagram or graph and asked to explain, summarize or describe the details in their own words. Candidates may be asked to explain or describe data, describe an event or object, how something works or describe different stages of a process.

Task 2: Candidates are asked to write an essay against a given problem, argument or point of view.

A formal style needs to be maintained by candidates while responding to both tasks.

Paper format – Two writing tasks are given to candidates and they need to be duly completed.

Timing – 60 minutes

Number of questions –2

Types of tasks – In task 1, visual information in the form of a diagram/chart/table/graph will be provided to candidates that need to be described in their own words. In the allotted time of 20 minutes, candidates are expected to write 150 words. In task 2, candidates are expected to respond to a problem or argument or a point of view. In the allotted time of 40 minutes, candidates are expected to write 250 words.

Answering – All the answers need to be written in full on the provided answer sheet. Candidates cannot use bullet points or notes in writing answers. Candidates can write on the question paper but this will not be evaluated by the examiner nor will it be taken outside the examination room.

Detailed descriptions of tasks

Task 1

Types of tasks and format –Candidates are required to describe figures or facts that are indicated in one or more tables, charts or graphs on a given topic. Else, they may be asked to describe a process, a device or a diagram of a machine. They have the option to write either in an academic style or neutral/semi-formal style. However, the most important details of the diagram need to be reflected in the answer of the candidate. It’s fine if minor details or points are left out.

Candidates are given only 20 minutes to complete this task. During this time, they are required to write at least 150 words. Also, there is a provision for evaluators to deduct one mark if the word limit is crossed. The longer answer would mean candidates will have less time in completing task 2.

Candidates should also keep in mind that they will be penalized in case of plagiarism or when the answer is not written in full or is off-topic.

All answers need to be written on the answer sheet.

The focus of tasks –This task is designed to gauge candidate’s ability to find out the most relevant and important trends and information in a diagram, table, chart or graph and describe them in an organized way matching academic style.

No. of questions –1

Task 2

Types of tasks and format –In this task, the candidates are asked to write on a given topic using a neutral/semi-formal or academic style. Answers should only deal with relevant issues. Therefore, candidates are advised to read the task carefully and provide answers to questions in a relevant way. For example, if candidates are asked about a particular aspect of computers, then their response has to be only on that aspect of computers and not about computers in general.

Not more than 40 minutes is allocated for this task. Also, answers should have at least 250 words in them. Candidates will be penalized if the answer falls short of the word limit. Longer answers are not preferred as the time left for checking the answers and making corrections will be limited. Candidates need to understand that task 2 contributes a lot more to their final score and, therefore, failing to attempt this task will greatly alleviate their chance of securing a good score.

If the answers are not written in full or they are off-topics, candidates will be penalized. Also, plagiarized content will be severely penalized. Candidates need to make sure all their answers are recorded on the answer sheet.

The focus of tasks –The focus of this task is to gauge the candidate’s ability to put forward a clear, well-organized, and relevant argument, giving enough examples or evidence to support ideas.

No. of questions –1

Speaking – 11-14 minutes

This section assesses the ability of the candidate to speak in English. Every test is recorded.

Part 1 – In this part, candidates are asked general questions about themselves on a variety of topics, like family, home, interests, studies, and work. The time allocated for this part is 4-5 minutes.

Part 2 – A card will be given to each candidate that reveals a particular topic. The candidate has to speak on that topic for 2 minutes. Candidates are given a minute to prepare before they start speaking. They will then be asked a couple of questions in connection with the topic given.

Part 3 – More questions on the topic a candidate gets in the card will be asked in this part. This part provides opportunities for candidates to discuss more issues and abstract ideas. Ideally, this part lasts between 4-5 minutes.

What scores are preferred by top universities?

Here are some of the top US universities that accept IELTS scores and their cut-offs

University Cut-off

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 7.0

California Institute of Technology 7.0

Harvard University 7.0

Princeton University 7.0

Yale University 7.0

University of Chicago 7.0

University of Pennsylvania 7.0

John Hopkins University 7.0

UC, Berkeley 7.0

Columbia University 7.0

University of California, Los Angeles 7.0

Duke University 7.0

Cornell University 7.0

University of Michigan 7.0

Carnegie Mellon University 7.0

Northwestern University 7.0

New York University 7.0

University of California, San Diego 7.0

University of Wisconsin – Madison 6.5

Brown University 7.0

University of Texas, Austin 6.5

University of Washington 7.0

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 7.0

Rice University 7.0

The Ohio State University 6.5

Boston University 7.0

Pennsylvania State University 6.5

Washington University, St Louis 7.0

Purdue University 6.5

University of California, Davis 7.0

University of Maryland, College Park 7.0

University of California, Santa Barbara 7.0

University of Pittsburgh 6.5

Michigan State University 6.5

University of Minnesota 6.5

University of Florida 6.0

Dartmouth College 7.0

University of Virginia 7.0

Texas A&M University 6.0

Arkansas State University 6.5

Butler University 6.5

California Institute of Integral Studies 6.5

Cleveland State University 6.5

College of Saint Rose 6.5

Colorado Technical University 6.5

Drake University 6.5

Edgewood College 6.5

Elon University 6.5

Florida Institute of Technology 6.0

Florida Atlantic University 6.5

Gannon University 6.5

George Mason University 6.0

High Point University 6.5

Indiana University of Pennsylvania 6.5

Indiana University, Southeast 6.5

Kansas State University, Manhattan 6.5

Kaplan University 6.5

Lesley University 6.5

Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus 6.5

MacMurray College 6.5

Marquette University 6.0

Marywood University 6.5

Mercy College 6.5

Middle Tennessee State University 6.5

Missouri State University, Springfield 6.5

Monmouth University 6.5

North Carolina State University 6.0

New Mexico State University 6.5

Notre Dame College 6.5

Oklahoma City University 6.5

Oregon State University 6.5

Robert Morris University 6.5

Roger Williams University 6.5

Silicon Valley University 6.5

San Diego State University 6.0

Southeastern Louisiana University 6.5

St. Ambrose University 6.5

Wright State University 6.5

Westminster College, Utah 6.5

Europe

University Country Cut-off

University of Oxford UK 7.0

University of Cambridge UK 7.0

Imperial College London UK 7.0

University College London UK 6.5

University of Oslo Norway 6.0

University of Helsinki Finland 6.5

London School of Economics and Political Science UK 7.0

University of Tartu Estonia 6.5

University of Vienna Austria 6.0

University of Edinburgh UK 6.5

King’s College London UK 7.0

KU Leuven Belgium 6.5

University of Manchester UK 6.0

University of Bristol UK 6.0

University of Warwick UK 6.5

University of Glasgow UK 6.0

Pompeu Fabra University Spain 6.5

Wageningen University and Research the Netherlands 6.0

LMU Munich Germany 6.5

University of Paris France 6.5

University of Sheffield UK 6.0

Durham University UK 6.5

University of Bergen Norway 6.5

Aalto University Finland 6.5

École Polytechnique France 6.5

University of Birmingham UK 6.0

University of Southampton UK 6.5

Technical University of Munich Germany 6.5

Autonomous University of Barcelona Spain 6.0

Queen Mary University of London UK 6.0

Ghent University Belgium 5.5

University of Graz Austria 7.0

University of Exeter UK 6.5

Lancaster University UK 6.0

Tallinn University Estonia 6.5

Telecom Paris France 5.5

University of Nottingham UK 7.0

University of Leeds UK 6.0

University of Aberdeen UK 6.0

University of St Andrews UK 7.0

University of Oulu Finland 6.5

UIT the Arctic University of Norway Norway 6.5

University of Leicester UK 6.0

University of Sussex UK 6.0

Newcastle University UK 6.5

Heidelberg University Germany 6.5

Leiden University the Netherlands 6.5

University of Navarra Spain 6.5

Erasmus University Rotterdam the Netherlands 6.5

University of Liverpool UK 6.0

Cardiff University UK 6.5

University of East Anglia UK 6.5

Université Catholique de Louvain Belgium 6.5

Vienna University of Technology (TU Wein) Austria 5.5

Tallinn University of Technology Estonia 6.5

Canada

University Cut-off

University of Alberta 6.5

University of Toronto 6.5 – 7.0

McMaster University 6.5

McGill University 6.5

University of British Columbia 6.5

Acadia University 6.5

Capilano University 6.5

Brescia University College 6.5

Concordia University 6.0

Canadian Mennonite University 6.5

Carleton University 6.5

Cape Breton University 6.5

Grant MacEwan University 6.5

Laurentian University 6.5

MacEwan University 6.5

Mount Royal University 6.5

Mount Saint Vincent University 6.5

Mount Allison University 6.5

OCAD University 6.5

Redeemer University College 6.5

Simon Fraser University 6.5

St. Thomas More College 6.5

Trinity Western University 6.5

University of New Brunswick 6.5

University of Manitoba 6.5

University of Northern British Columbia 6.5

University of Prince Edward Island 6.5

Vancouver Island University 6.5

York University 6.5

Australia

University Cut-off

University of Melbourne 7.0

University of Adelaide 6.5

Australian National University 6.5 – 7.0

University of Western Australia 6.5

University of Sydney 6.5

University of New South Wales 6.5

Monash University 6.5

University of Queensland 6.5

New Zealand

University Cut-off

University of Auckland 6.0 – 6.5

Auckland University of Technology 6.0 – 6.5

University of Otago 6.0 – 6.5

Lincoln University 6.0 – 6.5

Massey University 6.0 – 6.5

Victoria University of Wellington 6.0 – 6.5

University of Waikato 6.0 – 6.5

University of Canterbury 6.0 – 6.5

Asia

University Country Cut-off

National University of Singapore Singapore 6.5

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology South Korea 6.5

Korea University South Korea 6.5

Seoul National University South Korea 7.0

National University of Tainan Taiwan 4.0

Shizuoka University Japan 4.0

National Chiayi University Taiwan 4.0

Northeastern University China China 4.5

Josai International University Japan 4.5

Mae Fah Luang University Thailand 4.5

Kumamoto University Japan 4.5

Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Saudi Arabia 4.5

Hiroshima University Japan 5.0

National Chiao Tung University Taiwan 5.0

Sohar University Oman 5.0

University of Mumbai India 6.5

INSEAD Singapore 7.0

The University of Hong Kong Hong Kong 6.5

HKUST Business School Hong Kong 7.0

Nanyang Business School Singapore 6.5

IIM Ahmedabad India 6.0

Peking University China 6.5

China Europe International Business School China 5.5

CUHK Business School Hong Kong 7.0

Hebei United University China 5.0

China Pharmaceutical University China 6.5

Wuhan University China 4.5

Zhengzhou University China 6.0

Abu Dhabi University UAE 5.0

University of Tehran Iran 5.0

Ben Gurion University of the Negev Israel 5.0

Saga University Japan 5.0

Beijing Jiaotong University China 5.0

Istituto Marangoni Mumbai India 5.0

University Tunku Abdul Rahman UTAR Malaysia 5.0

Petronas University of Technology Malaysia 5.0

Ton Duc Thang University Vietnam 5.0

University of Science Malaysia USM Malaysia 5.0

Hankuk University of Foreign Studies HUFS South Korea 5.5

Southeast University China 5.5

University of the Philippines Philippines 5.5

United Arab Emirates University UAE 5.5

Tianjin University China 6.0

Anna University India 6.0

Indian Institute of Science India 6.0

Yokohama National University Japan 6.0

Symbiosis International India 6.0

What are the passing scores and what do the scores represent?

Like other standardized tests, IELTS doesn’t have a passing score as such. However, IELTS results are reported on a scale of 9-bands. The scoring patterns are designed to be simple and easy to understand. The band scores are provided from 1 (the lowest score) to 9 (the highest score).

Given below are different IELTS scales and their description:

Band Score: 0

Skill Level: Did not attempt the test

Description: The candidate did not attempt the questions

Band Score: 1

Skill Level: Non-user

Description: The candidate cannot use the language except a few words

Band Score: 2

Skill Level: Intermittent user

Description: The candidate is prone to extreme difficulty in understanding, speaking, and writing English

Band Score: 3

Skill Level: Extremely limited user

Description: The candidate is only capable of understanding and conveying in familiar situations. However, during communications, frequent breakdowns can be expected

Band Score: 4

Skill Level: Limited user

Description: The ability of the candidate is restricted to only familiar situations. Besides not being able to use complex language, the candidate is likely to show difficulties in understanding and expressing

Band Score: 5

Skill Level: Modest user

Description: The candidate has a modest command of the language and should be able to cope with most situations. However, they are prone to making mistakes. Their capability in handling basic communication is undoubted, especially in fields they are comfortable with.

Band Score: 6

Skill Level: Competent user

Description: Despite some misunderstandings, inappropriate usage, and some inaccuracies, the candidate has good control over the language. These candidates can understand detailed reasoning and can effectively handle complex language.

Band Score: 7

Skill Level: Good user

Description: The candidate has operational command of English. However, some misunderstandings, inappropriate usage, and inaccuracies are often reported in some situations. The candidate with this score is likely to understand detailed reasoning and can handle complex language situations well.

Band Score: 8

Skill Level: Very good user

Description: The candidate has excellent operational command of English with minor inappropriate usage and unsystematic inaccuracies. They are capable of handling detailed and complex argumentation well. However, they are prone to some misunderstandings in unfamiliar situations.

Band Score: 9

Skill Level: Expert user

Description: The candidate has a reliable and excellent operational command of English. They know how to use English in a fluent, accurate, and appropriate way. They also exhibit excellent understanding.

Edument approach for your IELTS preparation

IELTS is a standardized exam that checks your proficiency in the English language in various aspects, including listening, reading, writing, and speaking. A majority of English-speaking countries consider IELTS scores of international students while they attempt to reside or work in their country. Thus, a valid and high IELTS score improves your chances of opening the door that can help you move to a foreign country for studying or working there.

So, how do you make sure you are prepared well for IELTS and able to high a respectable score in the exam?

The answer is through meticulous and expert guidance from IELTS experts that are at Edument.

At Edument, we are dedicated to providing reliable and expert IELTS preparation services to students. In choosing us, students can look forward to following a systematic schedule of practice sections and lectures that will help them cover different aspects of IELTS. Our experienced and friendly IELTS tutors are always available to help address your queries and prepare you well for the exam. The specially developed IELTS video lectures help you identify key techniques that can enable you to prepare for the exam effectively.

The main attribute of our IELTS program is its flexibility. We provide the option to students to pursue the course at a pace they are comfortable with. Though our IELTS coaching program is designed to last for 4 weeks, it can be extended or reduced as per the requirements of students.

Students who attend our IELTS class complete computer-based simulated tests and study units. Our emphasis will always be on improving students’ reading, grammar, and reasoning skills as they are important in cracking the exam. We also conduct a series of mock tests so that candidates are better prepared for the real test. If you want to be a part of our IELTS coaching program or have any queries regarding it, get in touch with us.

Where to book your IELTS exam?

At Edument, we help you prepare for IELTS in a simple and effective way. Our IELTS experts are friendly and experienced and have helped hundreds of students crack IELTS easily. While we help you prepare for this important exam, you need to visit the official website of IELTS to book your exam.

Students need to visit https://www.ielts.org/for-test-takers/book-a-test and select one from many test locations and register to get started with the process. At the selected location, students have the option to choose between registering for IELTS on paper or on a computer. Students are advised to select an appropriate option. Payment for IELTS can be made online. There is also an option for students to download the application form to print and produce it at the test centre.

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